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Got Accent?

“I love your accent! Where are you from?” This is a question I often answer with pride. “I am originally from Cuba; it’s a Spanish accent!” I started studying English as a child when my parents realized that we had to flee our island. A private tutor would come to my house to torture me with verb conjugations, vocabulary memorization, and dialogues. When I came to the United States, I couldn’t understand anyone, and nobody could understand me. I now realize it was because my teacher focused on grammar and my ear was trained according to his Cuban pronunciation. Over the years, I became a language teacher, a professional interpreter, and even a public speaker that loves her Spanish accent! A person doesn’t have to be from a foreign country to have an accent. As a matter of fact, everybody has an accent. I can usually tell when I’m speaking to someone from New York, Alabama, Texas, or any region of the United States, and the same is true when I’m conversing in Spanish with someone from Spain or Latin America; their regional accent gives them away. Accents are unique and often reflect the characteristics and background of an individual, and as long as they don’t interfere with communication, they’re even considered exotic and romantic. In the melting pot we enjoy in the USA today, we normally know or hire individuals who were raised abroad, speaking a language other than English. They come here looking for the American Dream; they work hard, they’re intelligent, highly qualified (and in some cases, overqualified), have great work ethics, and they have passed...

Hispanic Population by 2050

The Hispanic population grew to 53 million in 2012, a 50% increase since 2000 and nearly six times the population in 1970, according to the most recent U.S. Census Bureau data. Projections released by the Pew Research Center show that the U.S. population will soar to 438 million by 2050 and the Hispanic population will triple (29% of the nation’s population).        ...

Why hire a professional translator or interpreter when we have bilingual employees?

In this multi-cultural society, it is not rare to find individuals who speak two or more languages. Most people, who have a certain level of fluency and proficiency speaking a second language, are defined as bilinguals.  In most instances, they have domain of their native language, and have either studied or been exposed to a second language at home or abroad. However, being bilingual does not mean that an individual can accurately and professionally translate from one language to another. To become a professional translator or interpreter, a bilingual person has to study both languages and cultures in depth, as well as the nuances of the different countries that speak the same language. Both interpreters and translators do not simply substitute words from one language to another; they understand the thought that is expressed in the source language, are able to give its rendition in the target language without, omitting, adding or adulterating the message. However, a bilingual employee is an invaluable asset in this global market.  People are always more confortable with those who can speak their language and understand their needs.  A bilingual employee has the innate ability to interact and build rapport with clients who share the same culture. That being said, next time you need to translate your manuals, brochures, flyers, letters, and more; make sure to hire the services of a professional translator.  If you need to verbally communicate a message, or have someone reiterate the information given at a meeting, you need to hire an interpreter....